Facebook Genealogy

Train Station, Evergreen, ALIn nearly every class or lecture I conduct on genealogy research techniques and strategies, I ask the group, “Who here is on Facebook?” The reaction ranges from a raised hand to snickers to an adamant “NO” here and there. Then I explain that there’s more to Facebook than reporting the BLT you may have had for lunch or whatever mundane activity  you’re involved with.

And here’s why I encourage everyone with an interest in family history research to take a long hard look at Facebook (FB) and where it can take you. If you want to tell your friends that you just saw a great movie or your favorite TV show, I have no problem with that at all. All I’m pointing out here is that there’s more to on-line research than Ancestry.com or FamilySearch.org.

I’m here to tell you that there are 10,029 genealogically and historically oriented FB pages in the United States listed on 288 pages with an index. That, according to Katherine R. Willson, is a list that grows constantly! Her website at SocialMediaGenealogy.com contains a link to a PDF file that you   are welcome to download and keep. The direct link to that file is here. But I urge you to take a look at her site and take in all of the information you can that she provides.

So that takes care of the US. But many of us do a significant amount of research in Canada. For that list, we turn to Gail Dever and her site, Genealogy à la Carte. This link will take you to the page where she talks about her work on the list. I encourage you to surf around her site, click on some of the links under “Archives.” The direct link to the page with the PDF is here. Scroll down a bit to find the link to the “Facebook for Canadian Genealogy which was last updated June 2016. She doesn’t list the FB links by number, but there are 26 pages of them!

In either of these files, just pick a subject, perhaps a surname or a hometown. Use CTL+F to open a box where you type in “Smith” without the quotation marks, for example. In the US list, “Smith” gets 48 hits. In other words, there are 48 FB pages that have something to do with Smith. Or just use Katherine’s index.

The same strategy of using CTL+F can be used in the Canadian document. For that matter, CTL+F works in just about any document or web page. Gail’s Canadian list has large groups of page sorted by Province. So you can scroll through or use the CTL+ strategy.

Double Helix - Red and Blue with BandsHere’s how FB has worked for me. I have relatives all over the country. My paternal ancestor arrived in the early 1700’s, a Scots-Irish immigrant. The Scots-Irish element is proven through Y-DNA matches with folks still in Europe. My maternal ancestors include at least one Mayflower ancestor (John Howland) and dozens of post-Mayflower arrivals. In 1621, William Bassett arrived and began the line that includes me, his 9th great grandson.  Many “Great Migration” ancestors arrived after that including Deacon Samuel Chapin, my 8th great grandfather, who first established himself in Roxbury, Massachusetts, then followed William Pynchon to help settle what would become Springfield, Massachusetts. I opened an FB page titled “Descendants of Deacon Samuel Chapin (1598-1675)” expecting a couple of dozen people asking to join. We now have a little over 125 descendants who have all contributed their specific line from the Deacon to themselves. This has provided me with enough data to complete, or nearly complete, a one-name study of the Chapin line. Since the information began to flow, I have confirmed my relationship to Amelia Earhart, President William Howard Taft, Johnny Appleseed, Harry Chapin, Marion Morrison a/k/a John Wayne and dozens of other individuals who have been in the public eye.

One of the other  FB pages is titled “Find-A-Grave Genealogy Discussion” for which I had moderate expectations. Today there are nearly 7,000 members who ask and answer questions, tell their Find-A-Grave stories and in general, provide a great deal of help to other researchers. On that site, I have 4 co-administrators to keep up with it all!

I have a few more pages, most involving genealogical or historical research. And I belong to about 40 others. Nearly all of these pages have proven helpful. They provide information I’m looking for and information I’d like to share while allowing me the opportunity to meet hundreds of like-minded people with whom I collaborate.

Facebook isn’t the only game in town. Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and others can be effective tools to assist you in your hunt for those elusive relatives.

So, are you on Facebook? Instagram? Pinterest? Twitter? If you are, that’s great but follow all the privacy and security recommendations. If you’re not, this could be a great time to get started.

Don’t forget to stop in at my Old Bones Genealogy of New England website. Background, services, lists of classes/lectures and a curious link called “Useful Documents.” Click it then scroll down a bit to the link that will take you to my DropBox folder where there are hundreds of forms, documents, and other useful things.

Use the QR code to the right to get to Old Bones Genealogy of New England:

Old Bones Genealogy of New England

Old Bones Genealogy of New England

8 thoughts on “Facebook Genealogy

    1. Dave Robison Post author

      Hello, Katherine! I’m sure we’ll meet soon. Will you be at NERGC? The New England Regional Genealogical Conference in April? I’m one of the Co-Chairs and that’s been taking up nearly all of my time. Two years of planning! http://www.nergc.org.

      Reply
  1. Elizabeth O'Neal

    I gave a lecture yesterday where I mentioned “getting social” with genealogy on Facebook. The reactions were mixed, but I think most of the attendees were just surprised to hear Facebook mentioned as a research strategy. It’s catching on though, and so worth promoting as a resource! 🙂

    Reply
  2. Pingback: This week’s crème de la crème — October 1, 2016 | Genealogy à la carte

  3. Gail DEver

    Thanks for mentioning my blog, Genealogy à la carte, and my list of Canadian Facebook groups and pages. Much appreciated!

    The link you provided to my website, however, goes to Katherine R. Willson’s Facebook list. The home page for my blog is http://genealogyalacarte.ca/.

    Also, you provided a direct link to a PDF of an Facebook list I produced in February 2016, which has since been greatly updated. You should instead direct people to my Facebook for Canadian Genealogy page where genealogists will find the latest list of 26 pages, produced in June 2016. http://genealogyalacarte.ca/?page_id=10169 .

    Reply
    1. Dave Robison Post author

      Wow….thanks for the corrections. I’m very pleased to hear from you and I’ll get that straightened out as soon as I can. As I mentioned in the blog, I mention you and Katherine in every beginner class and I’ll be talking about this at NERGC 2017 as a part of “The Rich Research Resources in Western Massachusetts.”

      Thanks!
      Dave

      Reply
    2. Dave Robison Post author

      Hi Gail, I believe I have this all straightened out but PLEASE check it. I shouldn’t be doing any edits while watching a Red Sox – Yankees game with the pennant on the line! I hope I got it this time!

      Dave

      Reply

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